Weekly Writing Post #45

Theodor Geisel published over 60 books during his lifetime, 44 as Dr Seuss. He remains one of the most beloved children's authors in the world. In 1957, he wrote How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, which ten years later, on this day, was first aired as an animated television special. It has since gone on to become a perennial holiday tradition in some form or another (Ron Howard directed a full length feature of the story in 2000, starring Jim Carey as the Grinch).

How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is about how, even when all of their material gifts end up in the Grinch's bag, the people of Whoville still celebrated Christmas because really, you can’t actually steal Christmas. Christmas is a good feeling and sense of community that lives inside all the Whos, gifts or no gifts. Which is why the Grinch's plan fails (spoilers! ;)).

So in the spirit of Dr Seuss and his Grinch, this week’s prompt is a reminder that the whole ‘buying’ and ‘receiving’ thing isn't the point. In fact, it's entirely beside the point. However you celebrate this season, be too busy celebrating to worry about the things a lot of people think this time of year is about, like expensive (or cheap) gifts. Enjoy time with your loved ones and be like the Whos, who came together despite their differences in age or opinion and have a wonderful Christmas, St. Lucia Day, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Omisoka and Yule.

Roberto Nickson

Weekly Writing Prompt #44

Some of you already know my penchant for 50s crooners, especially ‘old blue eyes’ Frank Sinatra. Francis Albert Sinatra was born on this day in 1915, so of course, today’s soundtrack is heavy on the Sinatra croon. Though he wasn’t always the most stand up guy (four marriages, links to the Mafia etc.) you can’t deny his talent. So this week’s prompt is to celebrate Old Blue Eyes.

Maria Fernanda Gonzalez

Don’t forget the Sinatra Christmas tunes this time of year!

Weekly Writing Prompt #42

This past weekend, my American family celebrated Thanksgiving. I know we don’t really celebrate it here in Australia, it’s not our holiday, but I do like to use it as a reminder to think about what I’m thankful for. This year I am thankful for my friends and family and all the support I have been given in starting my new business.

This week’s prompt will hopefully also ‘prompt’ you to think of what are you thankful for.

Jeremy Gallman

Weekly Writing Prompt #34

It’s Tolkien Week! The annual festival that honours the work of J.R.R. Tolkien and his son and editor, Christopher Tolkien. First celebrated in 1978 by the American Tolkien Society, Tolkien Week is the calendar week that contains September 22, Hobbit Day.

September 22nd is the Birthday of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, two characters from Tolkien’s popular books, The Hobbit and Lord Of The Rings, in which Hobbits, typically between two and four feet tall and nothing like your usual hero, accomplish great feats and amazing acts of courage.

Fans celebrate with anything from going barefoot all day and having seven meals (yes please!), to literary discussions and readings, Lord Of The Rings movie marathons and throwing parties in honour of the ‘Long Awaited Party’ at the start of The Fellowship Of The Ring with merriment, feasts, games, costumes and fireworks.

So to celebrate the humble Hobbit (and one of my favourite stories), this week’s prompt is the first line from The Hobbit.

T L

Weekly Writing Prompt #33

Tomorrow is Roald Dahl Day! You may not be aware, but Roald Dahl was more than a fabulous story teller. He was also a spy, a fighter pilot, a chocolate historian and a medical inventor.

But it is his stories that he is best known for. In 1961, James and the Giant Peach was published followed by Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Dahl even wrote screenplays for the James Bond movies and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. He has published many other classics, including Danny the Champion of the World, The Enormous Crocodile, Matilda and My Uncle Oswald.

Dahl was famous for his inventive, playful use of language, which was a key element to his writing. He would invent new words by scribbling them down before swapping letters around. He didn't always explain what his words meant, but he knew that children would work them out because they often sounded like a word they knew. For example, something lickswishy and delumptious is good to eat, whereas something uckyslush or rotsome is not definitely not! He also used sounds that children loved to say, like squishous and squizzle, or fizzlecrump and fizzwiggler.

Today, The Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre continues his extraordinary mission, such as celebrating Roald Dahl Day, to amaze, thrill and inspire generations of children and their parents.

I hope this week’s prompt inspires you to create your own amazing story.

Johnny McClung