Weekly Writing Post #46

Happy New Year! What a year 2018 was. I grew my business, I turned 40, I travelled and I reached my reading goal of 25 books! Did you reach your goals, even small ones like reading or writing more? Reaching these relatively small milestones should be seen as big achievements and celebrated just as much as bigger and more challenging ones.

My goals for 2019 include using my time in a more productive manner. Less procrastination, more time for life and less time for stress. Oh and upping my reading goal to 30 books!

Have you made any resolutions or set any goals for this year? Feel free to share them in the comments below.

This week’s writing prompt will hopefully spur you to begin any goal you want to achieve this year. So, just begin!

Gaelle Marcel

Weekly Writing Prompt #35

It’s Banned Books Week! This is an annual celebration of the Freedom to Read. Founded in 1982, Banned Books Week raises awareness of the fact that people are still trying to ban books and highlights the value of free and open access to information. Libraries and others in the book community use the week to show support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

During most of the 20th century, Australia was one of the strictest censors in the western world. Most imported publications were closely inspected before being released, and Australia frequently banned what was considered suitable reading in other countries such as Europe and America.

The Commonwealth Customs Department, which had the authority to prohibit imports, kept a reference library of around 15,000 books, magazines and comics banned in Australia between the 1920s and the 1970s.

Some of my favourite books were once considered unsuitable including To Kill a Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, The Handmaid’s Tale, The Bridge to Terabithia, even the Harry Potter series.

This week’s prompt comes from one such banned book, The Grapes of Wrath.

Fredrick Kearney Jr

Weekly Writing Prompt #34

It’s Tolkien Week! The annual festival that honours the work of J.R.R. Tolkien and his son and editor, Christopher Tolkien. First celebrated in 1978 by the American Tolkien Society, Tolkien Week is the calendar week that contains September 22, Hobbit Day.

September 22nd is the Birthday of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, two characters from Tolkien’s popular books, The Hobbit and Lord Of The Rings, in which Hobbits, typically between two and four feet tall and nothing like your usual hero, accomplish great feats and amazing acts of courage.

Fans celebrate with anything from going barefoot all day and having seven meals (yes please!), to literary discussions and readings, Lord Of The Rings movie marathons and throwing parties in honour of the ‘Long Awaited Party’ at the start of The Fellowship Of The Ring with merriment, feasts, games, costumes and fireworks.

So to celebrate the humble Hobbit (and one of my favourite stories), this week’s prompt is the first line from The Hobbit.

T L

Weekly Writing Prompt #33

Tomorrow is Roald Dahl Day! You may not be aware, but Roald Dahl was more than a fabulous story teller. He was also a spy, a fighter pilot, a chocolate historian and a medical inventor.

But it is his stories that he is best known for. In 1961, James and the Giant Peach was published followed by Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Dahl even wrote screenplays for the James Bond movies and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. He has published many other classics, including Danny the Champion of the World, The Enormous Crocodile, Matilda and My Uncle Oswald.

Dahl was famous for his inventive, playful use of language, which was a key element to his writing. He would invent new words by scribbling them down before swapping letters around. He didn't always explain what his words meant, but he knew that children would work them out because they often sounded like a word they knew. For example, something lickswishy and delumptious is good to eat, whereas something uckyslush or rotsome is not definitely not! He also used sounds that children loved to say, like squishous and squizzle, or fizzlecrump and fizzwiggler.

Today, The Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre continues his extraordinary mission, such as celebrating Roald Dahl Day, to amaze, thrill and inspire generations of children and their parents.

I hope this week’s prompt inspires you to create your own amazing story.

Johnny McClung

Weekly Writing Prompt #32

Tomorrow is International Read a Book Day! Yep. There is a day for just about everything now but this one I can get on board with.

Regular reading has so many benefits such as mental stimulation, stress reduction, vocabulary expansion, memory improvement, stronger analytical thinking skills, improved focus and concentration, plus it's pretty much free entertainment!

The other benefit is that it can improve your own writing. It's been noted that exposure to well-written work has an effect on one’s own writing. Observing the cadence, fluidity and writing styles of other authors can and will invariably influence your own work. In the same way that musicians influence one another and painters use techniques established by previous masters, so do writers learn how to craft prose by reading the works of others.

This week's prompt is inspired by Read a Book Day. What are you reading right now?

Michael Liao